Privacy and Security by Design: The need for a convergence

By Ann Cavoukian and Michelle Chibba

Personal information must be managed responsibly. When it is not, accountability is undermined and confidence and trust in government and modern surveillance programs are eroded. Whatever the future holds, society will require privacy, freedom, safety and security. To succeed in all of these areas, a convergence must occur through privacy and security by design.

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Addressing Access Control Needs of the Public Sector: A Case Study of the Forensic Services Coroner’s Complex

A trigger such as motion detection can be sent simultaneously to the cameras situated at the entrance and on the other side of the door in question of Toronto’s new Forensic Services and Coroner’s Complex to start recording activity. Photo © John Dowsett


By Geordie Seed

An access control and CCTV system was recently installed at Toronto’s new Forensic Services and Coroner’s Complex. Since it is critically important to prevent tampering with evidence, access to the lab would likely be limited to those with a high-security clearance level. Aside from having to attain access through normal means of door control, these individuals are also required to pass through a form of biometrics, such as a fingerprinting or iris scanning, before being granted access. As a further safeguard, a trigger such as motion detection can be sent simultaneously to the cameras situated at the entrance and on the other side of the door in question to start recording activity. This activity is then monitored in real time by security personnel and catalogued for future use if necessary.

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Privacy and Security by Design: OLG Case Study

By Ann Cavoukian and Michelle Chibba

One of the most common forms of biometric identification is the comparison of faces to stored images, such as a passport photo. Privacy advocates have long held surveillance and biometric systems represent significant concerns, but these technologies need not be privacy-invasive. With biometric encryption (BE), the system does not store the biometric template itself, but rather a ‘private’ or untraceable template in which the biometric is irreversibly bound to a cryptographic key. This system can be highly privacy-protective, yet accurate and secure, leaving no digital trail of biometric templates behind.

The Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation’s (OLG’s) self-exclusion program for problem gamblers has successfully combined facial recognition with BE technology. Indeed, it appears to be, by far, the largest installation of a BE system, as well as the first-ever application of BE to a watch-list.

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A Day in the Life of a Traffic Cop: Off-duty, but Still On-call

By Molly Doyle

Stibbe has been married to his wife, Nicole, for 18 years. They have two daughters—14-year-old Olivia and 10-year-old Taryn. When he is not dealing with the media or patrolling the streets, he works on his own cars at home. When he takes them in to get fixed, he always makes sure to double-check the dealer’s work.

In fact, when Stibbe started as a police officer, he wanted to get into collision reconstruction, which involves five levels ranging from beginner to expert. Currently, he has reached level four and completed an apprenticeship. Now, he has to decide when he wants to go in front of designation boards to be deemed a reconstruction officer, which involves determining the causes of road collisions and the types of resulting injuries.

“I want to do it, but I just haven’t done the final step,” he says. “I’m not ready for that in my career just yet.”

Exposing Tax Evasion with Analytics: Case study: IRS

By Wes Gill

The U.S. Internal Revenue Service (IRS) uses analytics to reduce tax filing fraud and maximize collections, saving millions of dollars that could otherwise go unpaid. It uses a program to analyze legislation and tax code changes, predict the tax revenue impact of disasters like Hurricane Katrina and formulate long-range collections forecasts for the U.S. Treasury.

The IRS estimates approximately 21 per cent of all claims for the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), for example, are paid in error. Due to the complexity of the law, many such errors are unintentional, but some claims reflect an intentional disregard for the law, potentially costing the government billions of dollars in fraud.

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